The 44 crimes Oakland can afford

I noted that police in Oakland, California have said they will no longer respond to 44 types of crime after the city was forced to lay off 80 officers for budgetary reasons.  My take; “When the taxpayer suffers significant economic reverses, police and fire protection are among the first services to be threatened by the adminocrat/union axis.”

I also speculated that the benefits were probably “Cadillac.” Well, RTWT, but here’s a look at Oakland police compensation and benefits:

  • total compensation for an OPD employee averages $162,000 per year
  • high end health plan premium paid entirely by the city
  • the city pays the entire pension contribution – 9% of salary and overtime


Update 11:05AM

Why Would 80 Police Officers Cost Oakland $100 Million?

Little noticed in the story of the Oakland police layoffs and the city’s ensuing crime spree is that less than six years ago Oaktown voters approved a tax specifically to pay for more cops.

I find this uncomfortably close to a proposal by the Ingham County Commissioners for additonal taxation to continue rural patrols.

See no evil. Hear no evil. But, hey, send us an online report.

Suffer These Crimes in Oakland? Don’t Call the Cops

[Oakland, CA Police] Chief Anthony Batts listed exactly 44 situations that his officers will no longer respond to and they include grand theft, burglary, car wrecks, identity theft and vandalism. He says if you live and Oakland and one of the above happens to you, you need to let police know on-line.

Other crimes where Oakland Police are saying “don’t call us, we’ll call you” include:

  • possession of forged notes [I think that means counterfeit currency]
  • pass fictitious check
  • obtain money by false voucher
  • fraudulent use of access cards

And two items that just had to be on the list of crimes to which Oakland Police will not respond:

  • extortion
  • attempted extortion

That last makes eminent sense, since it would be unseemly for Oakland police to suppress attempted extortion, when they are collaborating with the City government to practice it. 

So, to all the Progressives out there who natter incessantly, “Well, do those small government tea party fools want to go without police protection?”: You’re trumped. When the taxpayer suffers significant economic reverses, police and fire protection are among the first services to be threatened by the adminocrat/union axis:

The sticking point in negotiations appears to be job security. The city council asked OPD officers to pay nine percent of their salary toward their pensions, which would save the city about $7.8 million toward a multi-million dollar deficit. The police union agreed, as long as the city could promise no layoffs for three years.

What do you bet those are ‘defined benefit’ and not ‘defined contribution’ pensions? I’ll give even odds that the pensions, as currently constituted, pay 75% of highest (or last) salary and do so for life after 30 years service.  I’ll bet the retirees also have high-quality health insurance coverage, and that it costs them little to nothing.


Oakland residents can hope that they will not experience any of the recent unrest going forward, because:

Most of the officers who will be affected by the layoffs were on the streets of Oakland when Johannes Mehserle’s involuntary manslaughter conviction caused riots last Thursday.

And they won’t be next time because they couldn’t get 3 year employment guarantees.  Oh well, if they didn’t get such guarantees in exchange for contributing a piddling amount to pensions compared to private sector employees, in order to obtain superb benefits unavailable to private sector employees, then I guess they’ll just have to find happiness in not being on the streets during the next riot.

Locally, there is a parallel:  Ingham County is threatening to withdraw rural police patrols unless rural residents vote to pay more taxes specifically for the Ingham County Sheriff’s Department. County Comissioners seem to be saying, “The contract is up, and we are raising our prices for policing, for rural residents only.”  There has been no cogent explanation of how this essential service came to be on the chopping block compared to other services “offered” by the County.  There’s been no suggestion of an across the board cut in spending, for example.  That suggestion failed to materialize even while part-time employees of the County Road Commission continue to have Cadillac health insurance benefits and a few County employees recently received 20% raises.  Match that in the private sector.

I wonder just what what part of “County” the Ingham County Commissioners fail to grasp? What is the point of the Ingham County Sheriff’s Department if it does not patrol the County, and where is my tax cut when the County ceases to provide services for which I contracted? 

Apparently, my savings are in the Commissioners concession to forgo raising my taxes if I give up the service.  I don’t like their attitude, so the question of replacing the ICSD in toto should be on our ballot.  Ingham County can submit a bid.

When local governments ante up on the protection racket, it increasingly seems you’d be better off on your own.

McCain-Feingold, where would we be without it?

Campaign Reform Finance’s fiercest partisans fined for, wait for it … campaign finance violations. Soros-linked group hit with huge fine

Do any of you people who praised this abominable violation of the First Amendment get it yet? Campaign Finance Reform was NOT about campaign financing. It was about George Soros making his money go farther by eliminating yours from the competition.

America Coming Together (ACT) raised $137 million for its get-out-the-vote effort in 2004, but the FEC found most of that cash came through contributions that violated federal limits.

The group’s big donors included George Soros, Progressive Corp. chairman Peter Lewis and the Service Employees International Union.

Meanwhile, in Daly City, California – which only sounds like it was named after Chicago’s mayoral dynasty – we have the Paw family. There are six of them. Among them, they’ve donated $200,000 to Hillary Clinton’s campaign since 2005.

It isn’t obvious how the Paw family is able to afford such political largess. Records show they own a gift shop and live in a 1,280-square-foot house that they recently refinanced for $270,000. William Paw, the 64-year-old head of the household, is a mail carrier with the U.S. Postal Service who earns about $49,000 a year, according to a union representative. Alice Paw, also 64, is a homemaker. The couple’s grown children have jobs ranging from account manager at a software company to “attendance liaison” at a local public high school. One is listed on campaign records as an executive at a mutual fund.

The Paws’ political donations closely track donations made by Norman Hsu, a wealthy New York businessman in the apparel industry who once listed the Paw home as his address, according to public records. Mr. Hsu is one of the top fund-raisers for Mrs. Clinton’s presidential campaign. He has hosted or co-hosted some of her most prominent money-raising events.

Mr. Hsu is also a convicted felon who is wanted by the State of California.

For the last 15 years, California authorities have been trying to figure out what happened to a businessman named Norman Hsu, who pleaded no contest to grand theft, agreed to serve up to three years in prison and then seemed to vanish.

“He is a fugitive,” Ronald Smetana, who handled the case for the state attorney general, said in an interview. “Do you know where he is?”

Hsu, it seems, has been hiding in plain sight, at least for the last three years.

Since 2004, one Norman Hsu has been carving out a prominent place of honor among Democratic fundraisers. He has funneled hundreds of thousands of dollars in campaign contributions into party coffers, much of it earmarked for presidential hopeful Sen. Hillary Rodham Clinton of New York.

Well, we know where he was The Clinton campaign had this to say in Mr. Hsu’s defense:

“Norman Hsu is a longtime and generous supporter of the Democratic Party and its candidates, including Sen. Clinton,” Howard Wolfson, a spokesman for the campaign, said Tuesday. “During Mr. Hsu’s many years of active participation in the political process, there has been no question about his integrity or his commitment to playing by the rules, and we have absolutely no reason to call his contributions into question or to return them.”

Felony convictions for grand theft apparently don’t count against your integrity, even while they may demonstrate your commitment to the Clintons.

Update
: 8:11PM Thanks for the reminder to Republican Michigander.

Unaccountably, I forgot to add this earlier, Fieger faces indictment over campaign funds. That’s former Democrat Gubernatorial candidate and trial lawyer extraordinaire, Geoffrey Fieger. Jack Kevorkian could not be reached for comment.