“Some airplanes did something”

You can see one of them here, about to do something:a86a1-911121dc-wtc91139026-911_liberty

I remember this day quite distinctly, but some do not.

Ilhan Omar, for example, is unable to recall the religion, ethnicity or culture of the 9-11 murderers. She described them as “Some people,” who “did something.” Murdering 3,000 people and causing billions of dollars in damage is something, all right. But, we’re not to be reminded of that in a speech to the Council on American-Islamic Relations.

At least her remarks she didn’t go so far as to completely eliminate human agency. For that, you need a New York Times copy editor: NYT Updates Story Blaming Airplanes For Taking Down WTC

Omar and the Times weasel their way around the fact that Islamist fanatics murdered 3,000 people. They are working to erase the memory of it.

They share the idea that the United States is ultimately responsible for it.

Social Security is a compulsory Ponzi scheme

Apropos of his fear of calling a spade a spade (see also Obamneycare) Mitt Romney took Rick Perry to task last night because Perry called Social Security a Ponzi scheme. James Taranto mounts a defense of sorts:

Perry was not claiming that Social Security is literally a criminal enterprise but asserting that there are similarities between Social Security and a Ponzi scheme.

It is probably true that Perry did not literally mean Social Security is a criminal enterprise. It should be noted, however, that Social Security is not a criminal enterprise only by definition. The people who define what constitutes a criminal enterprise say so.

Imagine Social Security as an investment fund offered by a private company. The Social Security “prospectus” makes guarantees it manifestly cannot fulfill, and the executives in charge largely continue to lie about that. Its accounting practices are much worse than those of Enron. Payments are funded in a way which put Bernie Madoff in jail. The major difference between Madoff and the United States government is that Madoff could not legally exact “investments” with the threat of violence.

If Madoff could legally have paid US dollar investments back in Zimbabwean dollars, he’d be a free man. In contrast, those ultimately in charge of Social Security deliberately and continuously debase SS payments to their own advantage. Unaccountably, they are free men.

Social Security would be a better system if it were a criminal enterprise.

Always remember

Today is a day to honor the people who died on 9-11-2001. This video will help.

Today is a day to remember what you were doing when the planes hit the Twin Towers, the Pentagon and a field in Pennsylvania. And how you felt on 9-12.

The President wants you to think of today as a “day of service.” Perform some service if you want to, but it isn’t about helping your government or your fellows. Remember that.

Update & bumped 7:34PM:

Here’s an example of the first bit of the slippery slope the President’s National Day of Service has set us on.

NEW YORK – Americans planned beach cleanups, packages for soldiers and save-the-tree fundraisers along with familiar remembrances in three cities to mark eight years since the attacks of Sept. 11, the first time the anniversary was named a national day of service.

“Instead of us simply remembering the horrible events and more importantly the heroes who lost their lives on 9/11, we are all going to turn into local heroes,” said Ted Tenenbaum, a Los Angeles repair shop owner who offered free handyman services Thursday and planned to do so again Friday.

Now, I don’t quite know if it would have been better or worse if Mr. Tenenbaum had not used the word “simply.” Maybe he just meant to say we are honoring the dead and their loved ones by these good acts. Maybe. On the face of it, of course, it would seem worse if he hadn’t said “simply.” Except that the meaning of the day is so very simple. President Bush described it well on November 10, 2001.

“…Time is passing. Yet, for the United States of America, there will be no forgetting September the 11th. We will remember every rescuer who died in honor. We will remember every family that lives in grief. We will remember the fire and ash, the last phone calls, the funerals of the children.

“And the people of my country will remember those who have plotted against us. We are learning their names. We are coming to know their faces. There is no corner of the earth distant or dark enough to protect them. However long it takes, their hour of justice will come.

It is so very, very simple that Mr. Tenenbaum’s words made me sad. Remembering the heroes and victims of 911 is so completely simple that it need not, should not, involve a national commitment to heroic handyman services, much less celebration with save-the-tree fundraisers, or a beach cleanup.

Maybe next year they’ll clean up the beach near the Arizona.

Let us forget

Obama’s Plan to Desecrate 9/11

Sadly, that headline is neither fanatic nor fanciful. RTWT

9/11 is to become the “National Day of Service,” so we will no longer focus on external danger or the 3,000 who died. 9-11 is a past crisis which must be wasted away by Presidential edict.

Despite this attempted revisionism, 9-11 will remain a day of somber reflection, attenuated mourning and thoughts of “never again.” Americans aren’t the dupes Barack Obama and his fringe-left friends imagine them to be. 9-11 is sacred. Attempting to make it a day of celebration of the advent of carbon taxes and ACORN/SEIU/AFL-CIO/FoE/Color of Change organizing is reprehensible.

What’s next, designating December 7th as the “Day of Pan-Oceanic Multiculturalism?”

What Bush should say

The inestimable Scott Ott at Scrappleface has a draft speech leaked from the White House:

THE PRESIDENT: My fellow Americans, a handful of you this week have listened in on what passes for Congressional hearings. You’ve endured the speeches of politicians who arrived with their minds set in concrete, as bulwarks against the truth. You have watched as one of our nation’s brave, devoted, valiant soldiers was ignored and described (in so many words) as a liar.
These broadcasts brought joy to the caves of al Qaeda, the halls of al-Jazeera, and to the streets of places where 9/11 is celebrated with dancing as the day America was devastated.

…This week’s congressional hearings might lead you to believe that the important issues in this current conflict are body counts, troop counts and withdrawal dates.
For the United States military and the people in whose name they fight, the important issue is always and only victory.

…Two thousand one hundred and ninety days have slipped by since lower Manhattan slipped below the cloud of dust and smoke thrown up by the falling towers. The initial shock, outrage, grief and unity have begun to fade. As a result, we now face a threat worse than any individual attack. It’s called complacency. It’s the attitude that since nothing has happened to us here since 9/11, nothing will. It’s a suicide potion that politicians, pundits and pollsters dispense, and that far too many Americans have drunk.

…Recent polls show that 64 percent of Americans oppose the war. Let me tell you, on behalf of Gen. David Petraeus and the men and women who fight under the banner of freedom, 100 percent of our troops oppose the war. Our troops would rather be home holding their babies, mowing their lawns, taking the boys to football practice, eating a home-cooked meal.
But war has been declared on us. In time of war you do what you hate to preserve what you love.

In time of war, the question is never, ‘How soon can we bring the troops home?’ The question is: ‘How can we win?’ The question is: ‘What will it take to crush the enemy to the point of absolute surrender or impotent insignificance?’

The answer is most definitely not a bunch of grandstanding Senators berating the general they asked to crush that enemy.

It’s brilliant. Read it all.

More 9-11 thoughts

I recommend reading all of these and watching the video.

From There to Here
The emotional half-life of 9/11.
By Jonah Goldberg

…If I had said in late 2001, with bodies still being pulled from the wreckage, anthrax flying through the mail, pandemonium reigning at the airports, and bombs falling on Kabul, that by ‘07 leading Democrats would be ridiculing the idea of the war on terror as a bumper sticker, I’d have been thought mad. If I’d predicted that a third of Democrats would be telling pollsters that Bush knew in advance about 9/11, and that the eleventh of September would become an innocuous date for parental get-togethers to talk about potty-training strategies and phonics for preschoolers, people would have thought I was crazy. Then again, lots of people think I’m crazy already, so maybe that’s not the best example.

…But it’s important to remember that from the outset, the media took it as their sworn duty to keep Americans from getting too riled up about 9/11. I wrote a column about it back in March of 2002. Back then the news networks especially saw it as imperative that we not let our outrage get out of hand. I can understand the sentiment, but it’s worth noting that such sentiments vanished entirely during hurricane Katrina. After 9/11, the press withheld objectively accurate and factual images from the public, lest the rubes get too riled up. After Katrina, the press endlessly recycled inaccurate and exaggerated information in order to keep everyone upset. The difference speaks volumes.

The column I wrote in 2002 was subtitled “I want to be disturbed.” It seems that when it comes to 9/11 it would have been more fashionable if I’d written some pabulum subtitled “I wanna be sedated.” (Apologies to the Ramones).

Looking Back in Anger
Memorializing 9/11 is more vital than ever
by David J. Rusin

…September 11 has taken its place alongside December 7 as a date that lives in infamy — and one that is barely contemplated during the other 364 days. But consider the contrast. More than six decades have elapsed since the raid on Pearl Harbor, and the challenges made clear on that fateful morning were resolved in another age, by another generation. Conversely, the Long War with radical Islam that began in earnest merely six years ago stands closer to its outset than its denouement. In World War II parlance, it is still early 1942, and there has not yet been a Midway or a Guadalcanal to signal the turning point.

…Anger is frequently portrayed as a negative emotion that debases those who wield it. The counterpoint is offered by Bede Jarrett, a prominent Dominican priest of the early 1900s. “The world needs anger,” he argued. “The world often continues to allow evil because it isn’t angry enough.” Anger at an injustice spurs people to combat that injustice, as when neighbors unite to drive out drug dealers following the death of a child. Indeed, anger can be both principled and righteous — a force for good in the world.

Are you angry about 9/11 and its aftermath? I am.

I am angry at the carnage of that clear September morning, as 19 soldiers of Allah stole the lives of nearly 3,000 irreplaceable human beings. However, my anger extends far beyond those specific horrors and the terrorists who perpetrated them. Mohamed Atta can never kill again, but the malignant worldview that spawned him continues to target innocents each and every day. That ideology must be the ultimate focus of our anger.

I am angry at the failure of Western elites to robustly acknowledge the true nature of the enemy: a violent, repressive, and expansionist movement grounded in Islam. Rather, we are fed a litany of bromides about the role of poverty and “the religion of peace.” No war has ever been won without knowing the enemy, and this war will not be the first.

MSNBC
Video coverage of 9-11, 2001
Kathryn Jean Lopez